Warm Fuzzies

Like I posted not long ago, I’ve been thinking lots about behaviour management and how ‘good’ behaviour should and could be rewarded. One idea I saw on Pinterest was a ‘Warm Fuzzies’ idea.

 

Warm andFuzzy

 

Like I said I was taking into consideration the idea from Harry K Wong that rather than having rules, where children are rewarded for following, I planned to have more procedures. Ideally procedures do not have consequences should children not follow them. The only thing the teacher should have to say is, ‘What is the procedure?’. If children choose to not follow the procedure consistently, the procecdure then has a rule, which has positive and negative consequences if not followed.

I really thought about this, and I figured children always need positive reinforement to keep them motivated as a group to learn together, take responsibility of their learning and to be kind to one-another. Harry K Wong also says that children should not be rewarded for following a procedure (and I don’t think they should be rewarded for following a rule, as it is an expectation, not something they should do just to get a reward).

It’s for these reasons, that I like the idea of the ‘Warm and Fuzzies’ Jar. Each time I see a child trying their hardest, being kind to another person or following the values of the school where I am at, I’ll ask them to put a pom pom in the jar.

The reward of this jar is also something that follows the thoughts of Harry K Wong, who states that children shouldn’t be given a tangible ‘thing’ for doing something ‘good’, rather they should have ‘time’ to celebrate. He suggests that they should be given free time to complete unfinished work. I quite like the idea of this, but wouldn’t mind having a prize jar, with different rewards in it that can be drawn out when the jar is full.

Some ideas for this prize jar include:

  • Free play outside in a different playground that they’re used to
  • Ball game outside
  • Free time inside to complete unfinished work
  • Board game afternoon

I like these ideas because they still ensure children’s learning in a different way.

What are your thoughts?

Jemma

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Placemats

The school where I am teaching at next year has provided a fair few things for me already. One thing that can be quite expensive (or if you make your own, very time consuming), are placemats or name places for each child’s desk.

The school where I am teaching at has made them, specific to my requirements. All that I am required to do is to write the children’s names on and send them back to the school to be laminated.

While I am battling the heat and a head cold, I am bunkered in the air conditioning writing the children’s names on the placemats. I am working so slowly and carefully to get the hand writing correct for my Year Ones next year!

How are you preparing for your classroom next year?

Jemma